OPEQ Negotiations Simulation

Played globally by tens of thousands of students, developed by Wharton professor Maurice Schweitzer

Instructor-led
Skills you'll learn
  • Negotiations
  • Cooperation & Competition
  • Social Dilemma/Prisoner's Dilemma
  • Oligopoly
Time commitments
Experience duration:
60-90 mins
Full details below

OPEQ challenges students to manage the tension between cooperation and competition in a dynamic market

The exercise highlights the role of accountability, comparisons, and communication in promoting (and inhibiting) trust and cooperation. Through the exercise, participants make a series of decisions and have the opportunity to send messages.

The interface provides real-time graphs and tables that include message displays. The exercise is both ready to use and easy to tailor to focus on specific lessons (e.g., negotiation or economic principles).

An Introduction to OPEQ - are you Game?

With a comprehensive Instructor Toolkit, instructors decide which lessons to highlight in their debrief. The Toolkit provides a teaching note, video, and debrief instructions, and explains how the simulation can be tailored to focus on economics or negotiation lessons.

Interested in running OPEQ in your class? Please contact us.

For more simulations on negotiation, check out the Hearts Negotiations Game.

How our experiences work

Access teaching materials, support and notifications every step of the way

Setup

Configure for your learning objectives, set up classes in the experience

Players Prepare

Invite learners to enroll and set up their groups

Play

Run the experience and access support and notifications as you go

Debrief

Summarize the experience for your learners and the outcomes

Signup to unlock teaching notes and request a free demo *

Unlock extensive teaching notes, helper videos and free trial!

Create a ‘My Interactive’ account *This will unlock these across all of our experiences

Lessons of OPEQ Negotiations Simulation include:

  • Communication
  • Social comparisons
  • Accountability
  • Group size
  • Future relationship
  • Superordinate goals
  • Credibility
  • Social dilemmas
  • Nash equalibrium
  • Best response function

Gives students critical insight into the mechanics of cooperation

  • Communication
  • Social comparisons
  • Accountability
  • Group size
  • Future relationship

Demonstrates how trust promotes cooperation

  • Superordinate goals
  • Credibility
  • Social dilemmas

Can be used to teach game theory

  • Nash equalibrium
  • Best response function

Authors

Maurice Schweitzer - Headshot

Maurice Schweitzer

Professor of Operations, Information and Decisions

Read Maurice's Bio